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Capacity


Capacity building

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Capacity


Capacity building

All change starts with conversation. 

Our capacity building program aims to get people talking, sharing ideas and working together to create change. This section of our website (along with our "Thought Leadership" papers) provides best practice actions and the latest information to help practitioners reduce paper and energy use (including reduced fuel for travel), trim their legal 'wasteline' and provide increasingly cost effective, equitable and sustainable access to justice.

We offer these resources as a virtual and dynamic "Practitioner's Guide to Sustainability".

We invite you to attend our training programs, share resources and collaborate on ideas to help bring about long-term sustainability changes across the legal sector. Click here to contact us to share your own case studies and ideas on the topic.

Resources


Resources

Resources


Resources

  • The highest court in the UK, the Supreme Court aims to operate efficiently and use technology to support its operations. Its existing IT infrastructure was based on that used by the Ministry of Justice and did not meet the Supreme Court’s specific needs, particularly around cost, remote working, reporting, efficiency, and flexibility. The Supreme Court faced four specific challenges when it came to technology infrastructure:
    • The Justices and other staff needed to be able to work remotely, accessing vital documents while out of the office through a system that they are comfortable with.
    • The organisation had to meet stringent reporting requirements through fast, efficient access to case management information.
    • The Court’s workload is increasing so it needed a future-proofed solution to support growth.
    • Technology must enable the Court to operate as efficiently as possible, providing staff members with everything they require to carry out their roles.

The UK Supreme Court understood that it needed to change its technology strategy and in 2013 commissioned a consultancy company to investigate suitable alternatives. Click here to read the case study, or view the YouTube video here.


  • The incorporation of modern technologies into the justice system has led to the emergence of the new and innovative field of cyberjustice. According to a recent book published by the University of Ottawa , "eAccess to Justice", this term encompasses both the integration of information and communication technologies into judicial and extrajudicial dispute resolution processes and the digital networking of all stakeholders involved in judicial cases. The primary aim of cyberjustice is to use modern technologies to aid in the administration of justice, increase efficiency and ultimately reduce access to justice issues with which the legal system is plagued. eAccess to Justice  is a collection of articles resulting from a 7 year international Towards Cyberjustice project. The project’s main hypothesis was that information and communication technologies could significantly contribute to improving traditional legal processes as well as entirely modifying the conventional structure of trials. Click here to download a free copy of eAccess to Justice.

 

  • With the increasing availability of electronic filing across State and Federal courts in Australia, a number of important issues are emerging: how do internal work practices need to change to ensure documents are successfully filed, and should lawyers be changing how they write and prepare documents for this era of on-screen reading? US-based company, One Legal has produced a great little ebook "How to Produce Court Friendly PDFs" which helps answer the most frequently asked questions about e-filing and e-service and provides top tips for producing court friendly PDFs. Tips include: filing only text-based PDFs, aiming for a manageable document size, creating a searchable document that's easy to navigate, and using font and formatting that's easy to read on screen. Click here to download a copy of One Legal's ebook.

 

  • No one reasonably disputes that technology, when managed efficiently, reduces the cost of litigation and causes the conduct of a trial to be more efficient. However, advocates, judges and the court system, generally, have not fully adapted to available technologies, particularly technologies for the conduct of a paperless trial. The Canadian Advocates' Society's Paperless Trials Manual seeks to remedy this problem. Designed for advocates, judges and the court system generally, this Manual provides guidance on how to conduct a paperless trial. Click here to download the manual.

  • Changes to legal services will have an inevitable impact on the solicitor profession. In its 2016 report, The Future of Legal Services, The Law Society of England and Wales has identified the key drivers for change in the current landscape of legal services, and attempted to predict how solicitors’ and lawyers’ interests may change in the future, where they will face competition and what opportunities may present themselves in a changing market. Click here to read more.

  • A recent White Paper titled "The Future of the Courts", published by Thomson Reuter combined external opinion and internal expert views to create a composite forecast of the likely directions of court technology and procedural development in the coming decades. The authors sought insight from common law jurisdictions in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and elsewhere and were struck by the commonality of themes. Converging trends became apparent: in digitization, virtualization, and the challenges of a data-driven world. Inspiring opportunities were recognised: transforming the delivery of law to our community, increasing access to justice, removing disadvantage in the face of increasing inequality. But most of all, the paper identified increasing demands on people: tomorrow’s judges and their colleagues in the administration of justice will need a new approach to strategy, more empowered decision-making in the new digital world, and most of all the adaptability and agility to lead a court system that keeps pace with the rapidly changing demands of society. Click here to download the White Paper.
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Articles


Articles

Articles


Articles

In the changing landscape of legal practice, there is a wealth of research into the use of technology for cost, efficiency and sustainability outcomes.

Below are links to articles and presentations we thought might interest you:

 

  • Family law practice enters online territory by Melissa Coade Access the article here
  • Compelling case for online dispute resolution by Melissa Coade Access the article here
  • Gateways to Justice: design and operational guidelines for remote participation in court proceedings by Emma Rowden, Anne Wallace, David Tait, Mark Hanson and Diane Jones
  • Mobile Devices in Court: A Judicial Perspective by Laurie Newhook Access the article here
  • From paper to the present: the emergence of online services in courts A presentation by Phil Hocking Access the presentation here

Training


Training

Training


Training

Our first training session, Leaner and Greener: Top Tech Tips for a more Portable Practice, was offered to members of the NSW Bar Association as part of the Association's Continuing Professional Development offerings. Chaired by Dr Pip Ryan, UTS Faculty of Law and presented by Dermot Ryan SC and Adam Hochroth from the NSW Bar Association along with Beth Pattersn, Allens' Chief Legal and Technology Services Officer, the session offered some useful tips to making a barrister's practice more portable and more sustainable. Click here to review our Top Tech Tips.


Our project's Leadership Team member and globally recognised legal technology expert, Beth Patterson recently hosted a webinar for the International Legal Technology Association (ILTA). The  webinar discusses the challenges and opportunities of implementing artificial intelligence (AI) in practice, and at how AI improves efficiencies and client satisfaction, enhances lawyers and increases profits. Speakers include Andrew Arruda, CEO and cofounder of ROSS Intelligence, which invented ROSS, the world's first artificially intelligent lawyer; William Caraher, the Chief Information Officer at van Briesen & Roper S.C and Beth Patterson,Chief Legal & Technology Services Officer at Allens. Click here to view the webinar.

Conferences


Conferences

Conferences


Conferences

We were excited to take part in the Law and Courts in an Online World International Conference in Melbourne in November 2016. Our session, Disrupting the Court Process: Better, stronger, faster, cheaper and more sustainable courts?  stimulated conversation and debate, with an expert panel discussing the impact of technological innovation and change on court processes and the delivery of justice. You can access the conference papers here.

Our Leadership Group continues to look for opportunities to present at conferences and workshops to share our knowledge and ideas on sustainability opportunities in the legal sector. Fee free to contact us if you are looking for speakers or workshop presenters. We'd love to hear from you.