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Thought leadership


Thought leadership

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Thought leadership


Thought leadership

Over coming months we will be publishing a series of Thought Leadership papers on key environmental aspects, impacts, risks and opportunities within the civil litigation sector. These Thought Leadership papers form an important part of our virtual Practitioner's Guide to Civil Litigation and are designed to educate, inform and stimulate conversation, debate and most importantly action. We welcome your suggestions and input into future Thought Leadership pieces. Click here to send us your ideas.

Sustainability in Civil Litigation


Sustainability in Civil Litigation

 

Sustainability in Civil Litigation


Sustainability in Civil Litigation

 

Paper 1 of our Thought Leadership Paper series provides a brief overview of the Process Framework for Civil Litigation and discusses some of the opportunities identified for sustainability improvements across this sector. These opportunities are grouped into three key themes:

  • Low Hanging "Technological Fruit"The most clear-cut opportunities for reducing the footprint of civil proceedings arise from the growing use of technology by the courts.
  • Promoting Just, Quick and Cheap Access to Justice - Sustainability is synonymous with efficiency, and legal professionals and clients will benefit from the time and cost savings that flow from more efficient use of resources.
  • Catalysing Positive Change - Increasing awareness and skills development will go a long way to improving the uptake of best practice.

Click here to read more

 

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Best Practices in Cyberjustice


Best Practices in Cyberjustice

Best Practices in Cyberjustice


Best Practices in Cyberjustice

Professor Nicolas Vermeys, Associate Director Cyberjustice Laboratory, University of Montreal and colleague Karim Benyekhlef's paper on Best Practices in Cyberjustice outlines a series of important steps determined over 15 years of research, that those in charge of enacting technological change in the legal sector need to take to ensure that their system doesn’t become just another failed experiment. These steps include:

  • Be aware of the impacts of technological changes on human behaviour;
  • Be aware of the impacts of technological changes on legal rituals and practices;
  • Identify the true impacts of technological changes on processes;
  • Use an incremental or modular approach to technological change;
  • Be aware of the possible implications of outsourcing;
  • Identify possible compatibility issues with existing technology and practices;
  • Identify factual needs, not theoretical wants;
  • Use a collaborative approach;
  • Identify all costs, not simply acquisition costs;
  • Don’t just reproduce: Innovate.

Click here to download the paper.

Artificial intelligence in the legal sector


Artificial intelligence in the legal sector

Artificial intelligence in the legal sector


Artificial intelligence in the legal sector

A search for “artificial intelligence in law” produced 528,000 results in 0.34 seconds from just the News section of Google’s vast index. From the Web as a whole the search produced 3.4 million results and  912,000 Videos. To say AI is a hot topic is an understatement. In fact, one of the hottest topics in the legal community of late is the expected impact on their profession of super-fast computers with the capacity to simulate human intelligence and decision-making, a.k.a. “artificial intelligence” (AI). 

There is no doubt that the legal profession — tradition-bound and labour-heavy — is on the cusp of a transformation in which artificial-intelligence platforms dramatically affect how legal work gets done. Already big law firms are pouring money into AI as a way of automating tasks traditionally undertaken by junior lawyers. Many believe AI will allow lawyers to focus on complex, higher-value work, while others question whether AI will in fact cut jobs across the sector.

For this "Thought Leadership" topic we have compiled a number of recent articles on the impacts (both positive and negative) of AI in the legal sector. We invite you to click on the links below to read more:

  • How will artificial intelligence affect the legal profession in the next decade? Queen’s Law Reports struck a panel of alumni with varying perspectives on the issue to discuss the influence AI is likely to have on the practice of law. Professor Art Cockfield, was moderator, with participants Janet Fuhrer, Canadian Bar Association President and law firm partner; Jordan Furlong strategic consultant; and Jeff Fung and Addison Cameron-Huff, both lawyers and online entrepreneurs. Click here to read more.
  • Artificial intelligence disrupting the business of law. Its traditional aversion to risk has meant the legal profession has not been in the vanguard of new technology. But it is seen as ripe for disruption — a view that the Financial Times writes, is based not least on pressure from tech-savvy corporate clients questioning the size of their legal bills and wanting to reduce risk. Click here to read more.
  • Artificial Intelligence in Law: The State of Play in 2016. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its impact and applications in the legal profession is examined in this Thomson Reuters White Paper written by Michael Mills, Co-Founder & Chief Strategy Officer of Neota Logic, a provider of intelligent software. Click here to read more.
  • Artificial intelligence - a game changer in the legal industry? AI changes everything for law firms.  Today’s technology allows for contract review at a speed with which a lawyer simply cannot compete.  The result is a faster and more accurate work product.  Law firm clients get better results for less money. Does AI mean that lawyers will go the way of the dinosaur? This National Law Review Article says "hardly". Click here to read more.
  • Law needs to be reshaped as AI and robotics alter employment. The present wave of automation, driven by artificial intelligence (AI) is creating a gap between current legislation and new laws necessary for an emerging workplace reality, states a new report by the IBA Global Employment Institute (IBA GEI). The Global Legal Post provides a brief summary of this report. Click here to read more. 
  • An AI law firm wants to 'automate the entire legal world'. In 2014, commercial lawyer Noory Bechor got sick of the fact that 80 percent of his work was spent reviewing contracts. He figured the service could be done much cheaper, faster, and more accurately by a computer. Hence, he started LawGeex, a platform for automatized contract review. And according to Shmuli Goldberg, LawGeex’s VP Marketing, the contract review platform is just the start for LawGeex. “Our goal for the next couple of years is to automate the entire legal world,” he says. Click here to read more.
  • Lawyers could be the nest profession to be replaced by computers. Increasing automation of the legal industry promises to increase efficiency and save clients money, but could also cut jobs in the sector as the technology becomes responsible for tasks currently performed by humans. Advocates of AI, however, argue there could actually be an increase in the sector's labor force as the technology drives costs down and makes legal services more affordable to greater numbers of people. Click here to read more.

People-less courts driving sustainability in the digital age


People-less courts driving sustainability in the digital age

People-less courts driving sustainability in the digital age


People-less courts driving sustainability in the digital age

Coming soon!

A paperless legal sector


A paperless legal sector

A paperless legal sector


A paperless legal sector

After a  London-based law firm found that its employees were printing 1200 pages a day, many of which were left unclaimed on the printer, changes were implemented saving paper, time and significant costs. While the paperless firm may seem like an unattainable goal, the "less-paper" firm is very achievable. Click here to read more about the 3 must-have technologies to reduce paper consumption.